Puberty Talk with Boys

 

Talking to children about puberty is difficult and uncomfortable for many parents.  I have some tips for you to help you out with this important experience.

1-Start the conversations early. If you explain early on the changes he will experience, the puberty process will be much easier on everyone.

Be honest and serious. Children appreciate it.

Do not laugh or make fun of him in any way. As soon as you show disrespect for his feelings, he will lose trust in you and try to find his way in life without your help.

2-Find good books or websites that provide him with the proper information. Because otherwise he’s going to end up on the types of sites that you don’t want him learning from.

3-Let him know that physical changes are coming, and that his body is going through transformations that will lead him into being a man.  

Boys should know the following about  their puberty:

  • They will get pubic hair and underarm hair, and their body hair becomes thicker and darker.
  • They get acne and start to sweat more.
  • They also will smell differently and that’s why it’s necessary to mention the importance of daily showering and changing their clothes. Please spend sometime explaining to your child how to clean his private parts propeprly.
  • They have a growth spurt.
  • Their penises and testicles grow larger.
  • Their voices change and become deeper.
  • They grow facial hair and their muscles get bigger.
  • They sometimes have wet dreams, which means they ejaculate in their sleep.
  • Also let them know that girls at school are going to change too, and become young women.  
  • With boys, the focus can be on the penis. Since not all boys develop at the same time or rate, your son may feel like he is too big or too small. Make sure he undertands that every penis size is normal.
  • Some boys experience temporary breast growth during puberty. This is caused by changing hormone levels during puberty. It usually disappears within months.
  • *Let your son know that everyone goes through puberty at a different age and at a different rate, and that he should not compare his body to enyone else’s. On average, boys begin going through puberty a little later than girls, usually around age 10 or 11. But they may begin to develop sexually or have their first ejaculation without looking older.

4-Talk about Aggression and Respect

Mood and hormonal changes are part of growing up and everyone goes through it.

Parents should take the time to explain to their sons that puberty leads to more testosterone which will make your son more muscular and more aggressive. At this phase, boys need to clearly understand that with their new strength comes a responsibility to be respectful especially towards women- especially their moms.

5-Prepare your son for his sexual life. Tell him about sexuality, STIs, and how preganncy happens. Stress on the fact of respecting girls’ bodies and feelings. The masturbation talk should be done by the father or an uncle. Do not say negative things about the practice itself, because any feeling of shame you give him around his sexuality will be haunting him for the rest of his life. Only give him scientific information and make sure that he keeps his free time busy with a sport.

Always remember to be patient with your child’s awkward motor skills. His new body dimentions are new to him and he needs time to refine his coordination. If he drops a plate or a glass, it’s totally normal for this phase.

Let your child know that you’re available any time to talk- but it’s also important to initiate conversations. If you’re not entirely comfortable having a conversation about puberty, practice what you want to say first. Let your child know that it may be a little uncomfortable to discuss, but it’s an important talk to have. In order to avoid the eye-to-eye feelings, you can use the time when you’re alone in the car, and you tell him some information while you are focussing on the road. And of course you can always pay a visit to a pediatrician to help you out with this task.

 

Cesarean Section – C-Section

Cesarean delivery — also known as a C-section — is a surgical procedure used to deliver a baby through incisions in the mother’s abdomen and uterus.
A C-section might be planned ahead of time. Often, however, the need for a first-time C-section doesn’t become obvious until you are in labor.
Sometimes a C-section is safer for you or your baby than is a vaginal delivery. Your doctor might recommend a C-section if:
Your labor isn’t progressing. When your cervix isn’t opening enough despite strong contractions over several hours.
Your baby isn’t getting enough oxygen. For example when There’s a problem with the umbilical cord.
Your baby or babies are in an abnormal position.
You’re carrying multiples.
There’s a problem with your placenta. For example if the placenta covers the opening of your cervix (placenta previa)
You have a health codition. complex heart problems, high blood pressure requiring urgent delivery or an infection that could be passed to your baby during vaginal delivery — such as genital herpes or HIV.
Mechanical obstruction. You might need a C-section if you have a large fibroid obstructing the birth canal, a severely displaced pelvic fracture or your baby has a very large head.
You’ve had a previous C-section. Depending on the type of uterine incision and other factors, it’s often possible to attempt a vaginal birth after a previous C-section. In some cases, however, your doctor might recommend a repeat C-section.
Some women request C-sections with their first babies — to avoid labor or the possible complications of vaginal birth or to take advantage of the convenience of a planned delivery. However, this is discouraged if you plan on having several children.
Recovery from a C-section takes longer than does recovery from a vaginal birth. And like other types of major surgery, C-sections also carry risks to you and your baby.
Risks to your baby include:
Breathing problems. C-sections done before 39 weeks of pregnancy or without proof of the baby’s lung maturity might increase the risk of breathing problems for babies.
Surgical injury. Although rare, accidental cuts to the baby’s skin can occur during surgery.
C-section babies have a slightly higher risk of developing obesity, asthma and other ailments than do children born vaginally. There are differences between the microbial communities on their skin and in their guts than babies born vaginally.
Risks to the mother include:
Inflammation and infection of the endometrium (membrane lining the uterus). (endometritis) — can cause fever, foul-smelling vaginal discharge and uterine pain. It’s a dangerous condition that requires urgent medical help.
Increased bleeding. You’re likely to lose more blood with a C-section than with a vaginal birth.
Reactions to anesthesia. Adverse reactions to any type of anesthesia are possible.
Blood clots. The risk of developing a blood clot inside a vein — especially in the legs or pelvic organs — is greater after a C-section than after a vaginal delivery. If a blood clot travels to your lungs (pulmonary embolism), the damage can be life-threatening. You will be given medications to prevent it at the hopistal. You can aslo help prevent clots by walking frequently soon after surgery.
Wound infection. Infections are more common with C-sections compared to vaginal deliveries.
Surgical injury. Although rare, surgical injuries to nearby organs — such as the bladder can occur during a C-section. If there is a surgical injury during your C-section additional surgery might be needed.
Increased risks during future pregnancies. After a C-section, you face a higher risk of potentially serious complications in a subsequent pregnancy — including problems with the placenta — than you would after a vaginal delivery. The risk of uterine rupture, when the uterus tears open along the scar line from a prior C-section, is also higher if you attempt vaginal birth after C-section (VBAC).
If your C-section is scheduled in advance, certain blood tests will provide information about your blood type and your level of hemoglobin. These details will be helpful to your health care team in the unlikely event that you need a blood transfusion during the C-section.
If your C-section is planned before 39 weeks for a non-emergency reason, your baby’s lung maturity might be tested before the C-section. This is done with amniocentesis — a procedure in which a sample of the amniotic fluid is removed from the uterus for testing. Maturity amniocentesis can offer assurance that the baby is ready for birth.
Even if you’re planning a vaginal birth, it’s important to prepare for the unexpected. Discuss the possibility of a C-section with your health care provider well before your due date.
After a C-section, you’ll need time to rest and recover. Consider recruiting help ahead of time for the weeks following the birth of your baby.
During the procedure
While the process can vary, depending on why the procedure is being done, most C-sections involve these steps:
At home. Take a shower. Don’t shave your pubic hair. This can increase the risk of surgical site infection. If your pubic hair needs to be removed, it will be trimmed just before surgery.
At the hospital. Before your C-section, your abdomen will be cleansed. A tube (catheter) will likely be placed into your bladder to collect urine. Intravenous (IV) lines will be placed in a vein in your hand or arm to provide fluid and medication. You might be given an antacid to reduce the risk of an upset stomach during the procedure.
Anesthesia. Most C-sections are done under regional anesthesia, which numbs only the lower part of your body — allowing you to remain awake during the procedure. A common choice is a spinal block, in which pain medication is injected directly into the sac surrounding your spinal cord. In an emergency, general anesthesia is sometimes needed.
Abdominal incision. The doctor will make an incision through your abdominal wall. It’s usually done horizontally near the pubic hairline (bikini incision). If a large incision is needed or your baby must be delivered very quickly, the doctor might make a vertical incision from just below the navel to just above the pubic bone. Your doctor will then make incisions – layer by layer – through your fatty tissue and connective tissue and separate the abdominal muscle to access your abdominal cavity.
Uterine incision. The uterine incision is then made — usually horizontally across the lower part of the uterus (low transverse incision). Other types of uterine incisions might be used depending on the baby’s position within your uterus and whether you have complications, such as placenta previa — when the placenta partially or completely blocks the uterus.
Delivery. The baby will be delivered through the incisions. The doctor will clear your baby’s mouth and nose of fluids, then clamp and cut the umbilical cord. The placenta will be removed from your uterus, and the incisions will be closed with sutures.
If you have regional anesthesia, you’ll be able to hear and see the baby right after delivery.
After the procedure
After a C-section, most mothers and babies stay in the hospital for two to three days. You might use a pump that allows you to adjust the dose of intravenous (IV) pain medication.
Soon after your C-section, you’ll be encouraged to get up and walk. This will help prevent constipation and DVT.
You will be monitored for signs of infection, how much fluid you’re drinking, and bladder and bowel function.
You will be able to start breast-feeding as soon as you feel up to it. Your nurse or a lactation consultant will teach you how to position yourself and support your baby so that you’re comfortable. Your health care team will select medications for your post-surgical pain with breast-feeding in mind. Pain control is important since pain interferes with the release of oxytocin, a hormone that helps your milk flow.
When you go home
While you’re recovering:
Take it easy. Rest when possible. Get help from the family. For the first few weeks, avoid lifting anything heavier than your baby.
Support your abdomen. Use pillows for extra support while breast-feeding, straining or coughing. A pregnancy belt might provide additional support but it’s not necessary.
Drink plenty of fluids. Drinking water and other fluids can help replace the fluid lost during delivery and breast-feeding, as well as prevent constipation.
Take medication as needed. Most pain relief medications are safe for women who are breast-feeding, but avoid Aspirin.
Avoid sex. Don’t have sex until four to six weeks after surgery. But repmember to spend some time with your partner. Express your love to each other, even if it’s just a few minutes in the morning or after the baby goes to sleep at night.
Contact your health care provider if you experience:
Any signs of infection — such as a fever higher than 100.4 F (38 C), severe pain in your abdomen, or redness, swelling and discharge at your incision site
Breast pain accompanied by redness or fever
Foul-smelling vaginal discharge
Painful urination
Heavy bleeding that soaks a sanitary napkin within an hour or bleeding that continues longer than eight weeks after delivery
Postpartum depression — which can cause severe mood swings, loss of appetite, overwhelming fatigue and lack of joy in life
Wishing you a speedy recovery and a happy new role in life.

Preparing for Surgery Part 2

Your admission letter from the hospital will tell you the date and time of your operation, and what time you need to arrive.
It should also tell you which ward or department you’re going to be in, a contact number for your hospital or ward, and the consultant who will be taking care of you.
When you arrive, a member of staff will explain the processes to you and give you an identity bracelet to wear during your stay in hospital.
During your time in hospital, you may be asked the same questions by several people. This is routine, and ensures that correct information about you is checked and available at each stage of treatment.
You may want to ask some questions of your own, write them down in advance so you won’t forget anything.

Take any medicines your doctor asked you to take before surgery. However, if you normally take tablets or insulin for diabetes, make sure you mention that to the surgical team.
You’ll be asked whether you’re allergic to any medication, if you throw up after surgeries, or whether any relatives have ever had any problems with an anaesthetic.

You’ll be asked to change into a hospital gown, and the details of the operation will be explained. You’ll then be asked to sign a consent form, giving your permission for surgery to go ahead. This form indicates that you know what the surgery is for, and you understand the risks, benefits and alternative treatments.
For some operations, a needle connected to a drip will be injected into your hand, allowing fluids, nourishment and medicine to be given while you’re under anaesthetic.

You’ll be given an anaesthetic, so you won’t feel any pain during the operation.
A general anaesthetic will be needed for a major operation, which means you’ll be asleep throughout the whole operation. It will be given to you via an injection or gas, which you breathe through a mask.
The anaesthetist will be by your side the whole time you are asleep, carefully monitoring you, and will be there when you wake up.
If you don’t need to be put to sleep, you’ll be given a regional anaesthetic. This means you’ll be conscious throughout, but you won’t feel any pain. It may be a local anaesthetic, where a small area is numbed, or an epidural, which reduces sensation in the upper or lower areas of your body.

After surgery you’ll be moved to the recovery room, where you’ll be told how the operation went.
You may feel dizzy as you come round from the anaesthetic. A nurse will give you oxygen through tubes or a mask to help you feel better.
It’s common to feel sick or vomit after you’ve been given anaesthesia. You may also have a sore throat and dry mouth.
Your blood pressure will be taken via an automatic cuff that squeezes tightly at regular times. Your temperature will also be taken.

It’s important to find out how well your operation went. Here are some questions you may want to ask: (>>>>)

Tell your nurse as soon as you start to feel any pain, so they can give you painkilling medication as soon as possible, to stop it getting worse (the medication can take 20 minutes to start working).

The sooner you start to move around, the better. Lying in bed for too long can cause some of your blood to pool in your legs. This puts you at risk of a blood clot.
If possible, doing some leg exercises can help to prevent a blood clot. These may be as simple as flexing your knee or ankle and rotating your foot.
You may be given special support stockings to wear after surgery, or an injection to thin the blood slightly to help reduce the risk of clots.

Research shows the earlier you get out of bed and start walking, eating and drinking after your operation, the faster the recovery will be.

Before you leave hospital you will be given advice about how to care for your wound and how often to use the medications.
Feel free to ask your doctor some questions before you leave hospital. (>>>)

You might be feeling very tired when you get home, especially if you’ve had a major operation or a general anaesthetic.
It’s important to move around as soon as possible after surgery. This will encourage your blood to flow and your wounds to heal, and will build up strength in your muscles.
Generally, try to get back into your regular routine as soon as possible. Eat more healthily, start exercising to stay in shape, and stop smoking if you smoke.

If you or your caregivers at home notice any of the following signs after your operation, call the doctor immediately:
pain or swelling in your leg. The pain may be made worse by bending your foot upward towards your knee
the skin of your leg feeling hot or discoloured
the veins near the surface of your leg appearing larger than normal
Those could be signs of a deep venous thrombosis (DVT). If DVT is not treated, a pulmonary embolism may occur. Pulmonary embolism is a blood clot that has come away from its original site and become lodged in one of your lungs.
If you have a pulmonary embolism, you may experience more serious symptoms, such as:
breathlessness, which may come on gradually or suddenly
chest pain, which may become worse when you breathe in
collapsing suddenly

Your doctor will have given you an idea of how long it’ll take to get back to normal.
As a rough guide, it’ll take you about a week to recover from a simple operation such as gallbladder removal, and a few months to recover from a major operation such as a hip replacement.

Wishing you a speedy recovery.

Preparing for Surgery Part1

Facing surgery can be a frightening experience. You may be having questions, fears, and doubts. Research suggests that people who prepare mentally and physically for surgery have fewer complications, less pain and recover more quickly than others.
This episode is to guide you through the preparation process for surgery.

While emotional preparation is a necessary, preparing physically is also important for a successful surgical outcome. In the 2 weeks before your surgery, you should:
Stop smoking and alcohol drinking.
Eat a healthy diet.
Avoid aspirin, vitamin E, multivitamins, or other medications that interfere with blood clotting for a week before your surgery. Discuss it with your health care provider before stopping any medication.
Exercise regularly.

Some days before surgery, you’ll be asked to attend a pre-operative assessment, which may be an appointment with a nurse or doctor. You’ll be asked questions about your health, and some medical tests will be carried out.
Make sure that you inform your doctor about all the medications, vitamins and herbal supplements you take.
You’ll be given clear information on:
whether you need to stop eating and drinking in the hours before your operation
whether you should stop taking your usual medications before going into hospital
what to bring with you into hospital
how long you’ll be statying at the hospital
If your doctor has instructed you to fast before the operation, it’s really important that you don’t eat or drink anything – this includes light snacks, sweets and water. You need an empty stomach during surgery, so you don’t vomit while you’re under anaesthetic.
If you take insulin because of diabetes you’ll still need to avoid eating and drinking before surgery, but make sure your medical team is aware of your condition.

You’ll need to remove all body piercings, make-up and nail polish before your operation. This can help to reduce unwanted bacteria being brought into the hospital. Also, the doctors will need to see your skin and nails to make sure your blood circulation is healthy during the opeartion.

If you’re staying in hospital, you may wish to pack a hospital bag.

You may want to check with your hospital about their policy on the use of electronic devices during your hospital stay.

Let your surgeon know if you develop a cough, cold or fever a few days before surgery. They’ll advise whether your operation can go ahead.

You should avoid certain foods and dietary supplements before surgery.
having food in your system may cause nausea and vomiting, which can be dangerous. Some foods may complicate intestinal surgeries or cause diarrhea. In addition to this, Your doctor or surgeon will give you diet advice prior to surgery.
The night before your surgery, you should only drink beverages you can see through. Your body will digest these drinks quickly so your digestive system is cleared for surgery. Avoid juice with pulp, coffee with cream, cola and milk.
While fibrous foods are normally healthy for your body, you should not consume them prior to surgery. Fiber takes a longer period of time for your body to break down and your bowels need to be cleared out before surgery. Avoid high-fiber foods such as whole-wheat pasta, oatmeal, whole-grain bread, beans and lentils, artichokes, peas and broccoli, raspberries, pears, apples and oranges.
Your doctor may recommend that you stop taking any supplements one week before surgery.

Hypertension

Hypertension, also known as high blood pressure, is a chronic medical condition in which the blood pressure in the arteries is persistently elevated.

Hypertension usually does not cause symptoms initially, but sustained hypertension over time is a major risk factor for many deadly complications. Why?

when there’s too much pressure on the walls of the blood vessels, they might end up bursting somewhere in the body causing severe damage to the surrounding tissues.
Hypertension is classified as either primary (essential) hypertension or secondary hypertension. About 90–95% of cases are categorized as primary hypertension, defined as high blood pressure with no obvious underlying cause, except maybe the unhealthy lifestyle. The other 5–10% of cases are categorized as secondary hypertension, which is due to an identifiable cause, such as chronic kidney disease, narrowing of the aorta or kidney arteries, or an endocrine disorder.
If you ignore your blood pressure because you think symptoms will alert you to the problem, you are taking a dangerous chance with your life. Everybody needs to measure their blood pressure on a regular basis, and to prevent high blood pressure from developing.

So, are there any warning signs for hyertension?

There’s a common misconception that people with high blood pressure, will experience symptoms such as nervousness, sweating, difficulty sleeping or facial flushing. The truth is that hypertension is very often a symptomless condition.

You should not try to evaluate your symptoms in an attempt to self-diagnose high blood pressure. Diagnosis should only be made by your doctor.

Headaches or the lack of headaches are not reliable indicators of your blood pressure. Instead, please work with your doctor and know your numbers.

Except with hypertensive crisis, nosebleeds are not a reliable indicator for hypertention. If your nosebleeds are frequent (more than once a week) or if they are heavy or hard to stop, you should talk to your doctor.
Keep in mind that nosebleeds can be caused by a variety of factors.

A variety of symptoms may be indirectly related to HBP but are warning signs that need medical assessment. For example:
Blood spots in the eyes
Floaters in the eyes are not related to high blood pressure. However, an ophthalmologist may be able to detect damage to the optic nerve caused by untreated HBP.
Facial flushing
Facial flushing occurs when blood vessels in the face dilate. While facial flushing may occur while your blood pressure is higher than usual, HBP is not the cause of facial flushing.
Dizziness
Sudden dizziness, loss of balance or coordination and trouble walking are all warning signs of a stroke. HBP is one of the leading risk factors for stroke.

When blood pressure readings rise to dangerously high levels (systolic of 180 or higher OR diastolic of 110 or higher) you may notice obvious symptoms. In addition to extreme readings of blood pressure, if you experience:
Severe headaches
Severe anxiety
Shortness of breath
Nosebleeds
This is called a hypertensive crisis, and emergency medical treatment is needed.

Prevention
Much of the disease burden of high blood pressure is experienced by people who are not labeled as hypertensive. Lifestyle changes are recommended to lower blood pressure, before starting drug therapy. Mainly:
maintain normal body weight for adults (e.g. body mass index 20–25 kg/m2)
reduce dietary sodium intake to engage in regular aerobic physical activity such as brisk walking (≥30 min per day, most days of the week)
limit alcohol consumption to no more than 3 units/day in men and no more than 2 units/day in women
consume a diet rich in fruit and vegetables (e.g. at least five portions per day);
Effective lifestyle modification may lower blood pressure as much as an individual antihypertensive drug. Combinations of two or more lifestyle modifications can achieve even better results.
Resistant hypertension
Resistant hypertension is defined as hypertension that remains above goal blood pressure in spite of using, at once, three antihypertensive medications belonging to different drug classes. Low adherence to treatment is an important cause of resistant hypertension. Resistant hypertension may also represent the result of chronic high activity of the autonomic nervous system; this concept is known as “neurogenic hypertension”.
What are the causes?
Resistant hypertension has several possible causes, including one or more other underlying medical conditions. In addition to treating RH with medications, doctors typically investigate secondary causes, such as:
Abnormalities in the hormones that control blood pressure.
Artery-clogging plaque in blood vessels that nourish the kidneys.
Sleep problems, such as obstructive sleep apnea.
Obesity and heavy alcohol intake.

If undiscovered, hypertension can be a serious health problem. Get your blood pressure checked on a regular basis, and stick to a healthy lifestyle to prevent it.
all the best.

Tips for Healthy Eyes

When you’re seeing well and have no irritation, it’s easy to forget about going to the eye doctor. Often, if you wait until you notice an eye problem, it can be too late.
I have 7 tips to help you protect your eye health.

1. Get Regular Eye Exams
Children should have their first eye exam between the ages of 6 and 12 months, then regular eye exams at school age. It’s important to detect visual problems that could impede a child’s ability to learn.
Adults, especially those over 40, should have yearly eye exams, particularly to prevent age-related ocular conditions including macular degeneration, cataracts, and glaucoma.
2. Let Your Eye Doctor Know Your Health History
Be sure your optometrist or ophthalmologist knows about what’s medically relevant. There’s a connection between illnesses in the body and eye issues. Hypertension, blood pressure and diabetes can all be detected by looking in the back of the eye.
3. Control the Air Quality in Your Home or Office
In the winter, the heating systems in homes and offices create dry air. Consider using a portable humidifier to keep the air moist, which will help prevent eye irritation caused by dryness. If you have a pet, keeping their hair off areas where you sit or lie down, like couches and chairs, is important as well. Pet hairs can track in other irritants from outside that can cause inflammation in the eyes.
4. Give Your Eyes a Break from the Computer Screen
Taking the following steps to protect your eyes:
Make sure your glasses or contact lenses are adequate for computer use.
Some people may need glasses to help with contrast, glare, and eye strain when using a computer.
Position your computer so that your eyes are level with the top of the monitor. This allows you to look slightly down at the screen.
Try to avoid glare on your computer from windows and lights. Use an anti-glare screen if needed.
If your eyes are dry, blink more.
Every 20 minutes, rest your eyes by looking 20 feet away for 20 seconds. At least every 2 hours, get up and take a 15-minute break.
5. Eat Right for Your Eyes
Dark leafy greens and dark berries can protect against macular degeneration, which is the leading cause of vision loss in people over 60. Foods rich in omega-3s, like walnuts and fresh cold-water fish, can reduce inflammation in the blood vessels of the eye.
6. Protect Your Eyes
Wear sunglasses with 100 percent UVA and UVB protection. And protect your children’s eyes as well. Clean your contact lens case: After you put in your contacts, be sure that the case is empty of all solution: Dump it out, then rinse and dry the case before you store your lenses in it again. This will prevent bactria from growing in it. Choose good quality makup and never use it inside your eyes. Throw away mascara 3 months after the opening date.
7. Be Prepared While Travelling
While flying, your eyes might feel dry. If you are a frequent traveller, be ready with eye drops (artifical tears)
If you waer glasses or lenses, take an extra pair of lenses and your glasses, just in case. And while you’re on vacation, avoid swimming with your contact lenses, to avoid the effect of chemicals and bacteria in the water on them.

All the best to you.

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT)

Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)
There are many of options for psychotherapy, with different treatment approaches working best for different conditions.
Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a talking therapy that can help you manage several psychological problems by changing the way you think and behave.
CBT will not remove your problems, but it can help you deal with them in a more positive way.
The concept of CBT is that your thoughts, emotions, physical sensations and behavior are all interconnected. Negative thoughts cause negative feelings can can lead to negative actions, and that can trap you in a vicious cycle.
In CBT, problems are broken down into five main areas:
-situations
-thoughts
-emotions
-physical feelings
-actions
Then showing you how to change these negative patterns to improve your feelings and and actions.
Unlike some other talking treatments, CBT deals with your current problems, and will not focus on your past. It looks for practical ways to improve your state of mind on a daily basis.
CBT has been shown to be an effective way of treating a number of different mental health conditions: for example depression or anxiety disorders, OCD, panic disorde, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), phobias, eating disorders, sleep problems, problems related to alcohol misuse. CBT is sometimes used to treat people with long-term health conditions, such as chronic

What happens during CBT sessions?
You will usually have a session with a therapist once a week or once every two weeks. The course of treatment will take an average of 10 sessions, with each session lasting 30-60 minutes.
During the sessions, you will work with your therapist to break down your problems into their separate parts – such as your thoughts, physical feelings and actions.
You and your therapist will analyse these areas to work out if they are unrealistic or unhelpful and to determine the effect they have on each other and on you. Your therapist will then be able to help you work out how to change unhelpful thoughts and behaviours.
Common CBT interventions include:
– Setting realistic goals and learning how to solve problems learning how to manage stress and anxiety
– Identifying situations that are often avoided and gradually approaching feared situations
– Identifying and engaging in enjoyable activities
– Identifying and challenging negative thoughts
– Learning to become aware of feelings, thoughts
The eventual aim of therapy is to teach you to apply the skills you have learnt during treatment to your daily life. This should help you manage your problems and stop them having a negative impact on your life – even after your course of treatment finishes.
Types of CBT
CBT can be carried out in several different forms, including:
– Individual therapy – one-to-one sessions with a therapist
– Group therapy – with others who wish to tackle a similar problem
– A self-help book – where you carry out exercises from the book
– Acomputer program – known as computerised CBT (CCBT)

If applied correctly, CBT can change your life.

Best of luck

Child Talking Back

Child Rage

Bed Wetting