Child Masturbating

Has your child developed a habit of putting his hands in his underwear? Does this make you uncomfortable? Learn how do get them to stop.

At some point, most children explore their genitals just as they explore other parts of their bodies. By the age of 5, children need to be told proper manners when it comes to this private activity.

If your child has his hands in his pants, use a quiet and friendly tone and ask him to stop. Tell him that it’s something he should be doing privately, then encourage his interest in another activity.
Some kids don’t bathe their private areas properly, which can cause dry skin or a rash. Check to see that your child isn’t suffering irritation from a rash that’s causing itching.
Some children masturbate when they are bored in front of the TV set. If this is the case, limit the amount of TV your child watches, and when he does watch, give him an activity to play with, or sit beside him while he watches. It’s best if you don’t even mention the habit as a reason for the change in the routine.
If your child has been falling asleep masturbating, change the bedtime routine. Read for him, and when you turn off the light, stay in the room and talk quietly or give him a back rub. Once your child starts to fall asleep, you can leave the room.

If you have religious views that prohibit masturbation, don’t resort to punishment or shame to stop your child, as this can backfire and force your child to hide this activity and then feel guilty and ashamed.

Purchase a book about sexuality and development. Read it yourself first because there’s lots of stuff you may have forgotten and some things you may not even know! Share it with your child at an appropriate time. Let your child know that you’re available to answer any questions.

Wishing you and your family health and happiness.

Dyspareunia

 

What is dyspareunia?

Dyspareunia is the medical term for ‘painful intercourse’.
‘Dys’ means bad or difficult
Pareunia: ‘Par’ + ‘unia’ = pairing or sexual union, so, sexual intercourse.
It is a general term used to describe all types of sexual pain.
Sexual pain can occur during or after the sexual intercourse.
It can exist anywhere in the genital area – the clitoris, labia, vagina, or the lower abdomen.
If you experience painful intercourse, you may feel:
– Pain only at sexual penetration (entry)
– Pain with every penetration, even while putting in a tampon
– New pain after previously pain-free intercourse
– Deep pain during thrusting
– Burning pain or aching pain
– Throbbing pain, lasting hours after intercourse
Physical causes of painful intercourse differ, depending on whether the pain occurs at entry or with deep thrusting. Emotional factors can be associated with many types of painful intercourse.

Entry pain:
Pain during penetration may be due to:
– Insufficient lubrication. Mainly as a result of not enough foreplay, after menopause or childbirth or during breast-feeding.
– Certain medications are known to inhibit desire or arousal, which can decrease lubrication and make sex painful. These include antidepressants, high blood pressure medications, sedatives, antihistamines and certain birth control pills.
– Any injury or irritation from an accident, pelvic surgery, female circumcision or a cut made during childbirth to enlarge the birth canal (episiotomy).
– An infection in your genital area or urinary tract can cause painful intercourse. Eczema or Bartholin gland cyst or abscess can give you pain with sexual intercourse.
– Discrepancy between the size of the penis and that of the vagina. A very large penis might cause pain to the partner’s vagina.
– Vaginismus. Involuntary spasms of the muscles of the vaginal wall (vaginismus) can make attempts at penetration very painful.
– Congenital abnormality. A problem present at birth, such as the absence of a fully-formed vagina (vaginal agenesis) or development of a membrane that blocks the vaginal opening (imperforate hymen), could be the underlying cause of dyspareunia.

Deep pain:
Deep pain usually occurs with deep penetration and may be more pronounced with certain positions. Causes include:
– Certain illnesses and conditions: endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, uterine prolapse, retroverted uterus, uterine fibroids, cystitis, irritable bowel syndrome, hemorrhoids and ovarian cysts.
– Surgeries or medical treatments. Scarring from pelvic surgery, including hysterectomy, can sometimes cause painful intercourse. Medical treatments for cancer, such as radiation and chemotherapy, can cause changes that make sex painful.
There are also Emotional factors involved:
Emotions are deeply intertwined with sexual activity and may play a role in any type of sexual pain. Emotional factors include:
– Psychological problems. Anxiety, depression, concerns about your physical appearance, fear of intimacy or relationship problems can result in discomfort or pain.
– Stress. Your pelvic floor muscles tend to tighten in response to stress in your life. This can contribute to pain during intercourse.
– History of sexual abuse. Most women with dyspareunia don’t have a history of sexual abuse, but if you have been abused, it may play a role.

It is important to bear in mind that vaginismus can co-exist with any condition that causes dyspareunia. Vaginismus may also continue to be present even after the original cause has been resolved or managed.

Normal sexual intercourse should not cause you any pain. If it does, it can harm your sex life, your emotional intimacy and your self-image. It might also be a sign of life- threatening medical condition. That’s why it’s important to seek medical help if you experience dyspareunia.

I wish you the best of health.

Toxic Shock Syndrome

 

Toxic shock syndrome is a rare but serious medical condition caused by toxins produced by a bacterial infection.

Although toxic shock syndrome has been linked to tampon use in menstruating women, this condition can affect men, children, and people of all ages due to different reasons.
Infection usually occurs when bacteria enters the body through an opening in the skin. For instance, bacteria can enter through a cut, sore, or other wound.
Risk factors for this condition include a recent skin burn, skin infection, or surgery, recent childbirth, also the use of a diaphragm or vaginal sponge to prevent pregnancy.
Symptoms of toxic shock syndrome can vary from person to person. In most cases, symptoms appear suddenly. Common signs of this condition include:

a sudden fever
low blood pressure
headache
muscle aches
confusion
diarrhea
nausea
vomiting
rash
redness of eyes, mouth, and throat
seizures

You might attribute symptoms of toxic shock syndrome to another medical condition, such as the flu. However, if you experience the above symptoms after using tampons or after a surgery or skin injury, contact your doctor immediately.

Your doctor may make a diagnosis of toxic shock syndrome based on a physical examination and your symptoms. He may also check your blood and urine for bacteria, and assess your liver and kidney functions. They may also take swabs of cells from your cervix, vagina, and throat to be analyzed for the bacteria that cause toxic shock syndrome.

Toxic shock syndrome is a medical emergency. Some people have to stay in the intensive care unit for several days. Your doctor will most likely prescribe an intravenous (IV) antibiotics to help you fight the bacterial infection.
Other treatment methods for toxic shock syndrome vary depending on the cause. For example, if a vaginal sponge or tampon triggered toxic shock, your doctor may need to remove this foreign object from your body. If an open wound or surgical wound caused your toxic shock syndrome, the doctor will drain pus or blood from the wound to help clear up any infection.

You will also receive medications to stabilize blood pressure, boost your body’ immune system, and IV fluids to fight dehydration.
If left untreated, Toxic Shock Syndrome can lead to:

liver failure
kidney failure
heart failure
Shock
Death

Certain precautions can reduce your risk of developing toxic shock syndrome. For example:

changing your tampon/sanitary napkin every four to eight hours
washing your hands frequently to remove any bacteria
keeping cuts and surgical incisions clean and changing dressings often

Remember: if you notice any of the early warning signs of TSS on yourself or a family member who’s had a wound, infection, surgery, or her period recently, please contact your doctor or drive to the emergency room immediately- to save their lives.

Wishing you all the best.

Puberty Talk with Boys

 

Talking to children about puberty is difficult and uncomfortable for many parents.  I have some tips for you to help you out with this important experience.

1-Start the conversations early. If you explain early on the changes he will experience, the puberty process will be much easier on everyone.

Be honest and serious. Children appreciate it.

Do not laugh or make fun of him in any way. As soon as you show disrespect for his feelings, he will lose trust in you and try to find his way in life without your help.

2-Find good books or websites that provide him with the proper information. Because otherwise he’s going to end up on the types of sites that you don’t want him learning from.

3-Let him know that physical changes are coming, and that his body is going through transformations that will lead him into being a man.  

Boys should know the following about  their puberty:

  • They will get pubic hair and underarm hair, and their body hair becomes thicker and darker.
  • They get acne and start to sweat more.
  • They also will smell differently and that’s why it’s necessary to mention the importance of daily showering and changing their clothes. Please spend sometime explaining to your child how to clean his private parts propeprly.
  • They have a growth spurt.
  • Their penises and testicles grow larger.
  • Their voices change and become deeper.
  • They grow facial hair and their muscles get bigger.
  • They sometimes have wet dreams, which means they ejaculate in their sleep.
  • Also let them know that girls at school are going to change too, and become young women.  
  • With boys, the focus can be on the penis. Since not all boys develop at the same time or rate, your son may feel like he is too big or too small. Make sure he undertands that every penis size is normal.
  • Some boys experience temporary breast growth during puberty. This is caused by changing hormone levels during puberty. It usually disappears within months.
  • *Let your son know that everyone goes through puberty at a different age and at a different rate, and that he should not compare his body to enyone else’s. On average, boys begin going through puberty a little later than girls, usually around age 10 or 11. But they may begin to develop sexually or have their first ejaculation without looking older.

4-Talk about Aggression and Respect

Mood and hormonal changes are part of growing up and everyone goes through it.

Parents should take the time to explain to their sons that puberty leads to more testosterone which will make your son more muscular and more aggressive. At this phase, boys need to clearly understand that with their new strength comes a responsibility to be respectful especially towards women- especially their moms.

5-Prepare your son for his sexual life. Tell him about sexuality, STIs, and how preganncy happens. Stress on the fact of respecting girls’ bodies and feelings. The masturbation talk should be done by the father or an uncle. Do not say negative things about the practice itself, because any feeling of shame you give him around his sexuality will be haunting him for the rest of his life. Only give him scientific information and make sure that he keeps his free time busy with a sport.

Always remember to be patient with your child’s awkward motor skills. His new body dimentions are new to him and he needs time to refine his coordination. If he drops a plate or a glass, it’s totally normal for this phase.

Let your child know that you’re available any time to talk- but it’s also important to initiate conversations. If you’re not entirely comfortable having a conversation about puberty, practice what you want to say first. Let your child know that it may be a little uncomfortable to discuss, but it’s an important talk to have. In order to avoid the eye-to-eye feelings, you can use the time when you’re alone in the car, and you tell him some information while you are focussing on the road. And of course you can always pay a visit to a pediatrician to help you out with this task.

 

Transgender and Intersex

Transgender people are people who experience a mismatch between their gender identity and their assigned sex. Transgender people are sometimes called transsexual if they desire medical assistance to transitionfrom one sex to another. Transgender is also an umbrella term: it may include people who are not exclusively masculine or feminine (people who are genderqueer, e.g. bigender, pangender, genderfluid, or agender), third gender, or cross-dressers.
Being transgender is independent of sexual orientation: transgender people may identify as heterosexual, homosexual, bisexual, asexual, etc., or they may consider conventional sexual orientation labels inadequate or inapplicable.
The term “transgender” can also be distinguished from “intersex”. Intersex is a term that describes people born with physical sex characteristics “that do not fit the typical description of male or female bodies”.
The degree to which individuals feel genuine, authentic, and comfortable within their external appearance, and accept their genuine identity is called “transgender cong-ruence”.
Many transgender people experience “gender dysphoria”. Gender dysphoria is the medical term used to describe people who experience significant distress with the sex and gender they were assigned at birth. Some people with gender dysphoria seek medical treatments such as hormone replacement therapy, sex reassignment surgery, or psychotherapy. Not all transgender people desire these treatments, and some cannot undergo them for financial or medical reasons.
Transgender people face discrimination and unfair treatment in many cultures and situations.
So let’s talk about intersex! As an introduction; let’s discuss some embryology. Emryology is the science that studies the development of embryos and fetuses in the womb.

The external genitalia of males and females are undifferentiated at 4 and 6 weeks of pregnancy, and then start to differentiate at 10 weeks for males and 20 weeks for females. The final illustrations are the external genitalia at birth. It is important to realize that the same initial tissue makes up different structures in males and females.
Some people have different circumstances, that prevent them from developing along the same path that others do. The results of these developments may be “intersex individuals” who have sex characteristics of both males and females.
“Intersex” is a general term used for a variety of conditions in which a person is born with a reproductive or sexual anatomy that doesn’t seem to fit the typical definitions of female or male.

Let’s have a look at some images by dr. Frank Netter. For example, a person might be born appearing to be female on the outside, but having mostly male-typical anatomy on the inside. Or a person may be born with genitals that seem to be in-between the usual male and female types—for example, a girl may be born with a noticeably large clitoris, or lacking a vaginal opening, or a boy may be born with a notably small penis, or with a scrotum that is divided, so that it has formed more like labia. Or a person may be born with mosaic genetics, so that some of her cells have XX chromosomes and some of them have XY.
Though we speak of intersex as an inborn condition, intersex anatomy doesn’t always show up at birth. Sometimes a person isn’t found to have intersex anatomy until they reach the age of puberty, or find themselves infertile adults, or die of old age and are autopsied. Some people live and die with intersex anatomy without anyone (including themselves) ever knowing.

Which variations of sexual anatomy count as intersex?
In practice, different people have different answers to that question. Imagine the sex spectrum as the color spectrum. There are different wavelengths that translate into colors most of us see as red, blue, orange, yellow. In the same way, nature presents us with sex anatomy spectrums. Breasts, penises, clitorises, scrotums, labia, gonads—all of these vary in size and shape.

The “sex” chromosomes can vary a lot, too. But in human cultures, sex categories get simplified into male, female, and sometimes intersex, in order to simplify social interactions.

So, nature doesn’t decide where the category of “male”,“intersex”, and “female” begin and end. Humans decide. Humans decide whether a person with XXY chromosomes or XY chromosomes and androgen insensitivity will count as intersex.

There is no evidence that children who grow up with intersex genitals are worse off psychologically, than those who are altered.

In fact, there is evidence that children who grow up with intersex genitals do well psychologically. In other words, these surgeries happen before the age of assent or consent, are unnecessary. Parents often ask for these operations because they fear discrimination against their children.
“Ambiguous” genitalia are not diseased, nor do they cause disease; they just look “funny” to some uninformed people. And this no reason to cut a child’s body parts off. A better solution would be to increase the society’s awareness about intersex.

There is substantial evidence that people who have been treated under the “optimum gender of rearing” model have suffered harm, psychological and physical.

And parents consenting to intersex surgeries do not appear to be fully informed about the available evidence, about
1-alternatives available to them;
2-about the risks associated with surgeries,
3-or about the theoretical problems underlying the “optimum gender of rearing” approach.

For example, they are typically not told the evidence that gender identity may emerge to an important degree from prenatal hormonal actions on the brain—and thus, that you can’t “make” a child a maintain a particular gender identity in the long term by doing surgery on him or her in infancy.

The best way to be a better human is to learn something new about science every day. If we all accept each other with all our differnces, the world will be a much better place. Wishing you the best of health.

Vaginismus

Vaginismus is a condition where there is involuntary tightness of the vagina during attempted intercourse. The tightness is actually caused by involuntary contractions of the pelvic floor muscles surrounding the vagina. The woman does not directly control or ‘will’ the tightness to occur; it is an involuntary pelvic response. She may not even have any awareness that the muscle response is causing the tightness or penetration problem.
In some cases vaginismus tightness may begin to cause burning, pain, or stinging during intercourse. In other cases, penetration may be difficult or completely impossible. Vaginismus is the main cause of unconsummated relationships. The tightness can be so restrictive that the opening to the vagina is ‘closed off’ altogether and the man is unable to insert his penis. The pain of vaginismus ends when the sexual attempt stops, and usually intercourse must be halted due to pain or discomfort.
Types of vaginismus
When a woman has never at any time been able to have pain-free intercourse due to this muscle spasm; her condition is known as primary vaginismus. Some women with primary vaginismus are unable to wear tampons and/or complete pelvic exams. Many couples are unable to consummate their relationship due to primary vaginismus.
Vaginismus can also develop later in life, even after many years of pleasurable intercourse. This type of condition, known as secondary vaginismus, is usually precipitated by a medical condition, traumatic event, childbirth, surgery, or life-change (menopause).
Vaginismus is a common cause of ongoing sexual pain and is also the primary female cause of sexless (unconsummated) marriages. Sexual pain can affect women in all stages of life; even women who have had years of comfortable sex. While temporarily experiencing discomfort during sexual intercourse is not unusual, ongoing problems should be diagnosed and treated.

Examples of Vaginismus – In the vaginismus condition, as the man approaches the woman, her PC muscle group involuntarily tightens the vaginal entrance making intercourse painfully impossible or penetration may be successful but may result in burning, discomfort, and pain.
So, is this problem t reatable?
Vaginismus is highly treatable and a full recovery from vaginismus is the normal outcome of treatment. Successful vaginismus treatment does not require drugs, surgery, hypnosis, nor any other complex invasive technique. Following a straight-forward program, pain-free and pleasurable intercourse is attainable for most couples.

Here’s a summary of how the treatment works in 4 steps:

Step 1 – Understanding Sexual Anatomy and Vaginismus Women often lack complete information about their body’s sexual anatomy, function, and the causes of sex pain. Confusion regarding problems with inner vaginal areas and vaginal muscles frequently lead to misdiagnosis and frustration. That’s why it’s very important to start solving the vaginismus problem with anatomy and physiology education. Step 2 – Sexual History Review & Treatment StrategiesEmotional reviews help detail any negative events, feelings, or memories that may collectively contribute to involuntary pelvic responses. Topics also include blocked or hidden memories and how to move forward when there have been traumatic events in a woman’s past. In some conservative communities the problem might be more common due to the fact that raising girls with the belief that sex is a taboo will make it more difficult for them to enjoy sexuality after marriage. Step 3 – Vaginal Tightness & The Role Of Pelvic Floor Muscles Learning how to identify, selectively control, exercise and retrain the pelvic muscles to reduce pain and alleviate penetration tightness and difficulties is an important step in vaginismus treatment. Step 4– Graduated Vaginal Insertions When used properly, vaginal dilators are effective tools to further help eliminate pelvic tightness due to vaginismus. Graduated vaginal insertion exercises allow women to comfortably transition to the stage where they are ready for intercourse without pain or discomfort. // The final step toward overcoming vaginismus includes penis entry with movement and freedom from any pain or tightness.
Have patience. Do not rush it. The treatment might take weeks or months but it will eventually help you get a normal sexual life. Use relaxation techniques. Focus on breathing deeply in and out. Listen to music and think of happy things. Keep remembering that sexuality is beautiful and fulfilling and a pure expression of love.
All the best to you.

Bartholin Gland Cyst

When I was a teenager, I had very little information about my body. My mother was too shy to open up and talk to me about my sexual develeopment. There was no Internet, and no books available to answer my questions.
One morning I was washing my body, them I usddently stumbled upon a very strange pea sized swelling right at the opening of my vagina. I was 14 or so. I was mortified. I was scared to tell my mother. I spent days trying to figure out what I’d done wrong, or thinking maybe I had cancer!

It turned out to be a Brtholon cyst.
What are the Bartholin glands?
The Bartholin glands are two small organs under the skin in a woman’s genital area. They are on either side of the folds of skin (labia) that surround the vagina and urethra. Most of the time, you can’t feel or see the Bartholin glands.
The Bartholin glands make a small amount of fluid that moistens the outer genital area, or vulva. This fluid comes out of two tiny tubes next to the opening of the vagina. These tubes are called Bartholin ducts.
What are Bartholin gland cysts?
If a Bartholin duct gets blocked, fluid builds up in the gland. The blocked gland is called a Bartholin gland cyst. These cysts can range in size from a pea to a large marble. If the Bartholin gland or duct gets infected, it’s called a Bartholin gland abscess.
Bartholin gland cysts are often small and painless. Some go away without treatment. But if you have symptoms, you might want treatment. If the cyst is infected, you will need treatment.
What causes a Bartholin gland cyst?
Things like an infection, thick mucus, or swelling can block a Bartholin gland duct and cause a cyst.
Infected Bartholin cysts are sometimes caused by sexually transmitted infections (STIs). But they can also happen when you don’t have sex.
What are the symptoms?
You may not have any symptoms if the Bartholin gland cyst is small. But a large cyst or an infected cyst (abscess) can cause symptoms.
Symptoms of a cyst that is not infected include:
A painless lump in the vulva area.
Redness or swelling in the vulva area.
Discomfort when you walk, sit, or have sex.
Symptoms of an infected cyst include:
Pain that gets worse and makes it hard to walk, sit, or move around.
Fever and chills.
Swelling in the vulva area.
Drainage from the cyst.
How are Bartholin gland cysts diagnosed?
You may find a Bartholin gland cyst on your own. Unless it is causing symptoms, you may not know you have one.
An abscess is diagnosed based on signs of infection, such as fever or swelling, and pain in the vulva area.
In some cases, especially if you are older, your doctor may remove the cyst to make sure that it isn’t cancer or another problem.
How are they treated?
Some Bartholin gland cysts go away without treatment. You can take a nonprescription pain medicine to relieve pain. To help healing, soak the area in a shallow, warm bath, or a sitz bath.
A sitz bath is one in which the hips and buttocks are put in water. It is usually used to promote healing and symptom relief around the bottom, such as for hemorrhoids, or genitals, such as for pain following childbirth.
There are different types of sitz baths to choose from, many of which can be purchased at medical supply stores. A common type is a basin that fits on a toilet seat and is filled with water.

Don’t have sex while a Bartholin cyst is healing.
If the cyst is infected, it may break open and start to heal on its own after 3 to 4 days. But if the cyst is painful, your doctor may drain it. You may also need to take antibiotics to treat the infection.
To keep the cyst from closing and filling up again, your doctor may put a small drainage tube with a small balloon at one end inside the cyst. The balloon is inflated inside the cyst to keep the cyst open. After the gland has healed, the tube and balloon are removed.
For severe cysts that keep coming back, you may have surgery to remove the Bartholin gland and duct.
There is a procedure called marsu-pia-lization in which a pouch is created by making a cut over the cyst and stitching the sides together. This allows the cyst to drain.
Don’t be scared of your bartholin gland.
All the best.

Endometriosis

The endometrium is a layer of cell tissue lining the uterus. During the menstrual cycle, the endometrium grows to be thick and blood vessel-rich, because this is the environment for the implantation of the baby if there’s pregnancy.
Endometriosis is usually a long-lasting (chronic) disease, you are born this way. When you have endometriosis, the type of tissue that lines your uterus (endometrium) is also present outside your uterus. These clumps/implants of tissue may have grown on your ovaries or fallopian tubes, the outer wall of the uterus, the intestines, or other organs in the belly. In rare cases they spread to areas beyond the belly.
With each menstrual cycle, these clumps/ implants go through the same growing, breaking down, and bleeding that the uterine lining (endometrium) goes through. This is why endometriosis pain may start as mild discomfort a few days before the menstrual period and then usually is gone by the time the period ends. But if an implant grows in a sensitive area, it can cause constant pain or pain during certain activities, such as sex, exercise, or bowel movements.
So the main two problems with endometriosis are the chronic pain and the infertility.
There is no cure for endometriosis, but treatment can help with pain and infertility.
Treatment depends on how severe your symptoms are and whether you want to get pregnant. If you have pain only, hormone therapy to lower your body’s estrogen levels will shrink the implants and may reduce pain. If you want to become pregnant, having surgery and infertility treatment may help.
Not all women with endometriosis have pain. And endometriosis doesn’t always get worse over time. During pregnancy, it usually improves, as it does after menopause. If you have mild pain, have no plans for a future pregnancy, or are near menopause (around age 50), treatment may be unnecessary.
So how is endometriosis treated? If you have pain or bleeding but aren’t planning to get pregnant soon,birth control hormones (patch, pills, or ring) or anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) may be all that you need to control pain. Birth control hormones are likely to keep endometriosis from getting worse. If you have severe symptoms or if birth control hormones and NSAIDs don’t work, you might try a stronger hormone therapy.
Besides medicine, you can try other things at home to help with the pain. For example, you can apply heat to your belly and exercise regularly.
If hormone therapy doesn’t work or if growths are affecting other organs, surgery is the next step. It removes endometrial growths and scar tissue. Laparoscopy can improve pain and your chance for pregnancy. In severe cases, removing the uterus and ovaries (hysterectomy and oophorectomy) is an option. This surgery causes early menopause. It is only used when you have no pregnancy plans and have had little relief from other treatments.
Infertility treatment
If you are having trouble becoming pregnant even after surgery, you can consider trying fertility drugs with insemination or in vitro fertilization. Endometriosis may have no permanent cure, but you can always discuss your family planning options with your doctor, and stick to a treatment plan, which might take long to succeed, so you will need to have patience.

Best of luck.

Bed Wetting

Endocrine Glands