Hair Dyes

Do hair dyes pose health risks?

Cosmetic makers have stopped using compounds known to cause cancer in animals. But some experts claim that these newer ingredients aren’t much different from the things they’re replacing.

Health experts suggest that you may reduce your risk of cancer by using less hair dye over time or by not dyeing your hair until it starts to gray.

Follow these safety tips when dyeing your hair:

  • If you’re in a salon, ask to be seated in a well-ventilated area. If you’re at home, open up the windows so you’re breathing in fresh air, not toxic fumes.
  • Carefully read and follow the directions in the hair dye package. If you lose the information leaflet, you will find them online. Just searh for the name of the brand you are using.
  • Don’t leave the dye on your head any longer than needed.
  • Wear gloves when applying hair color.
  • Rinse your scalp thoroughly with water after using a hair dye.
  • Never mix different hair dye products.
  • Be sure to do a patch test for allergic reactions before applying the dye to your hair. Almost all hair dye products include instructions for doing a patch test. It’s important to do this test each time you dye your hair. To test, put a dab of dye behind your ear and don’t wash it off for two days. If you don’t have any signs of allergic reaction, such as itching, burning, or redness at the test spot, you can be somewhat sure that you won’t have a reaction to the dye when it’s applied to your hair. If you do react to the patch test, do the same test with different brands or colors until you find one to which you’re not allergic.
    – Never dye your eyebrows or eyelashes. An allergic reaction to dye could cause swelling or increase risk of infection around or in your eyes. This can harm your eyes and even cause blindness
    Spilling dye into the eye by accident could also cause permanent damage.

So what about Hair Dyes and Pregnancy?
Remember that hormonal changes can make your hair react differently, so you might not get what you expect — even from your regular formula, so. Always test a strand first.
Not much is known about the safety of hair dyes during pregnancy. In the few animal and human studies that have been done, no changes were seen in the developing baby. But to be on the safe side, make sure you sit in a well-ventilated room while applying the dye. Talk with your doctor if you have questions or concerns.

Wishing you the best of health.

Puberty Talk with Boys

Preparing for Surgery Part 2

Your admission letter from the hospital will tell you the date and time of your operation, and what time you need to arrive.
It should also tell you which ward or department you’re going to be in, a contact number for your hospital or ward, and the consultant who will be taking care of you.
When you arrive, a member of staff will explain the processes to you and give you an identity bracelet to wear during your stay in hospital.
During your time in hospital, you may be asked the same questions by several people. This is routine, and ensures that correct information about you is checked and available at each stage of treatment.
You may want to ask some questions of your own, write them down in advance so you won’t forget anything.

Take any medicines your doctor asked you to take before surgery. However, if you normally take tablets or insulin for diabetes, make sure you mention that to the surgical team.
You’ll be asked whether you’re allergic to any medication, if you throw up after surgeries, or whether any relatives have ever had any problems with an anaesthetic.

You’ll be asked to change into a hospital gown, and the details of the operation will be explained. You’ll then be asked to sign a consent form, giving your permission for surgery to go ahead. This form indicates that you know what the surgery is for, and you understand the risks, benefits and alternative treatments.
For some operations, a needle connected to a drip will be injected into your hand, allowing fluids, nourishment and medicine to be given while you’re under anaesthetic.

You’ll be given an anaesthetic, so you won’t feel any pain during the operation.
A general anaesthetic will be needed for a major operation, which means you’ll be asleep throughout the whole operation. It will be given to you via an injection or gas, which you breathe through a mask.
The anaesthetist will be by your side the whole time you are asleep, carefully monitoring you, and will be there when you wake up.
If you don’t need to be put to sleep, you’ll be given a regional anaesthetic. This means you’ll be conscious throughout, but you won’t feel any pain. It may be a local anaesthetic, where a small area is numbed, or an epidural, which reduces sensation in the upper or lower areas of your body.

After surgery you’ll be moved to the recovery room, where you’ll be told how the operation went.
You may feel dizzy as you come round from the anaesthetic. A nurse will give you oxygen through tubes or a mask to help you feel better.
It’s common to feel sick or vomit after you’ve been given anaesthesia. You may also have a sore throat and dry mouth.
Your blood pressure will be taken via an automatic cuff that squeezes tightly at regular times. Your temperature will also be taken.

It’s important to find out how well your operation went. Here are some questions you may want to ask: (>>>>)

Tell your nurse as soon as you start to feel any pain, so they can give you painkilling medication as soon as possible, to stop it getting worse (the medication can take 20 minutes to start working).

The sooner you start to move around, the better. Lying in bed for too long can cause some of your blood to pool in your legs. This puts you at risk of a blood clot.
If possible, doing some leg exercises can help to prevent a blood clot. These may be as simple as flexing your knee or ankle and rotating your foot.
You may be given special support stockings to wear after surgery, or an injection to thin the blood slightly to help reduce the risk of clots.

Research shows the earlier you get out of bed and start walking, eating and drinking after your operation, the faster the recovery will be.

Before you leave hospital you will be given advice about how to care for your wound and how often to use the medications.
Feel free to ask your doctor some questions before you leave hospital. (>>>)

You might be feeling very tired when you get home, especially if you’ve had a major operation or a general anaesthetic.
It’s important to move around as soon as possible after surgery. This will encourage your blood to flow and your wounds to heal, and will build up strength in your muscles.
Generally, try to get back into your regular routine as soon as possible. Eat more healthily, start exercising to stay in shape, and stop smoking if you smoke.

If you or your caregivers at home notice any of the following signs after your operation, call the doctor immediately:
pain or swelling in your leg. The pain may be made worse by bending your foot upward towards your knee
the skin of your leg feeling hot or discoloured
the veins near the surface of your leg appearing larger than normal
Those could be signs of a deep venous thrombosis (DVT). If DVT is not treated, a pulmonary embolism may occur. Pulmonary embolism is a blood clot that has come away from its original site and become lodged in one of your lungs.
If you have a pulmonary embolism, you may experience more serious symptoms, such as:
breathlessness, which may come on gradually or suddenly
chest pain, which may become worse when you breathe in
collapsing suddenly

Your doctor will have given you an idea of how long it’ll take to get back to normal.
As a rough guide, it’ll take you about a week to recover from a simple operation such as gallbladder removal, and a few months to recover from a major operation such as a hip replacement.

Wishing you a speedy recovery.

Preparing for Surgery Part1

Facing surgery can be a frightening experience. You may be having questions, fears, and doubts. Research suggests that people who prepare mentally and physically for surgery have fewer complications, less pain and recover more quickly than others.
This episode is to guide you through the preparation process for surgery.

While emotional preparation is a necessary, preparing physically is also important for a successful surgical outcome. In the 2 weeks before your surgery, you should:
Stop smoking and alcohol drinking.
Eat a healthy diet.
Avoid aspirin, vitamin E, multivitamins, or other medications that interfere with blood clotting for a week before your surgery. Discuss it with your health care provider before stopping any medication.
Exercise regularly.

Some days before surgery, you’ll be asked to attend a pre-operative assessment, which may be an appointment with a nurse or doctor. You’ll be asked questions about your health, and some medical tests will be carried out.
Make sure that you inform your doctor about all the medications, vitamins and herbal supplements you take.
You’ll be given clear information on:
whether you need to stop eating and drinking in the hours before your operation
whether you should stop taking your usual medications before going into hospital
what to bring with you into hospital
how long you’ll be statying at the hospital
If your doctor has instructed you to fast before the operation, it’s really important that you don’t eat or drink anything – this includes light snacks, sweets and water. You need an empty stomach during surgery, so you don’t vomit while you’re under anaesthetic.
If you take insulin because of diabetes you’ll still need to avoid eating and drinking before surgery, but make sure your medical team is aware of your condition.

You’ll need to remove all body piercings, make-up and nail polish before your operation. This can help to reduce unwanted bacteria being brought into the hospital. Also, the doctors will need to see your skin and nails to make sure your blood circulation is healthy during the opeartion.

If you’re staying in hospital, you may wish to pack a hospital bag.

You may want to check with your hospital about their policy on the use of electronic devices during your hospital stay.

Let your surgeon know if you develop a cough, cold or fever a few days before surgery. They’ll advise whether your operation can go ahead.

You should avoid certain foods and dietary supplements before surgery.
having food in your system may cause nausea and vomiting, which can be dangerous. Some foods may complicate intestinal surgeries or cause diarrhea. In addition to this, Your doctor or surgeon will give you diet advice prior to surgery.
The night before your surgery, you should only drink beverages you can see through. Your body will digest these drinks quickly so your digestive system is cleared for surgery. Avoid juice with pulp, coffee with cream, cola and milk.
While fibrous foods are normally healthy for your body, you should not consume them prior to surgery. Fiber takes a longer period of time for your body to break down and your bowels need to be cleared out before surgery. Avoid high-fiber foods such as whole-wheat pasta, oatmeal, whole-grain bread, beans and lentils, artichokes, peas and broccoli, raspberries, pears, apples and oranges.
Your doctor may recommend that you stop taking any supplements one week before surgery.

Endocrine Glands

Fitness Definitions

Now let’s get to understand some fitness definitions that are important for you.

  • Aerobic/cardiovascular activity. These are exercises that are strenuous enough to temporarily speed up your breathing and heart rate. Like, running, cycling, walking,swimming, and dancing.
  • Flexibility training or stretching. This will enhance the range of motion of joints. Age and inactivity tend to cause muscles, tendons, and ligaments to shorten over time. Remember that stretching and warming up are not the same. In fact, stretching cold muscles and joints can make them prone to injury.
  • Strength, weight, or resistance training. This type of exercise is aimed at improving the strength and function of muscles. Specific exercises are done to strengthen each muscle group. Weight lifting and exercising with stretchy resistance bands are examples of resistance training activities, as are exercises like pushups in which you work against the weight of your own body.
  • Set. Usually used in discussing strength training exercises, this term refers to repeating the same exercise a certain number of times. For instance, a weight lifter may do 10 biceps curls, rest for a few moments, then perform another “set” of 10 more biceps curls.
  • Repetition or “rep.” This refers to the number of times you perform an exercise during a set. For example, the weight lifter mentioned above performed 10 reps of the bicep curl exercise in each set.
  • Warm up. This is the act of preparing your body for the stress of exercise. The body can be warmed up with light intensity aerobic movements like walking slowly. These movements increase blood flow, which in turn heats up muscles and joints so they would be more functional and less prone to injury.
  • Cooldown. This is the less-strenuous exercise you do to cool your body down after the more intense part of your workout. For example, after a walk on a treadmill, you might walk at a reduced speed and incline for several minutes until your breathing and heart rate slow down. Stretching is often part of a cooldown.
  • Maximum Heart Rate is based on the person’s age. An estimate of a person’s maximum age-related heart rate can be obtained by subtracting the person’s age from 220. So it you’re 30 years old, your maximum heart rate should be 190.
  • A way to measure the intensity of your exercise is to check your heart rate or pulse during training. These should be within a target range during different levels of intensity.
  • A person’s target heart rate should be 50% of his or her maximum heart rate.

 

Home Fitness Equipment

Home Exercise Equipment

Exercise doesn’t have to be done at the gym. You can work out in the comfort of your own home, with or without equipment. Exercises such as squats, lunges, pushups, and sit-ups, you can use the resistance of your own weight to condition your body. To boost your condition and strength, you may also want to use some home exercise equipment.

Experts offer their thoughts on some popular home exercise items:

  • Treadmill or elliptical trainer, trampolines
  • Free weights. Barbells, dumbbells and kettlebells
  • Flexible bands, and flexible rods.
  • Exercise balls.  
  • Exercise videos and DVDs.
  • Don’t forget to have comfy clothes on and to drink enough Water. Take sips during the training.

Best of luck!

Alyaa Gad

 

 

Eating with Acne

Recent research indicates a link between the food we eat and getting acne.

Hormones, especially testosterone and insulin are thought to be responsible for most cases of acne.

Dairy products may cause a rise in your testosetrone levels, and refined sugars increase your insulin.

In some cases, food allergy may worsen the case of acne, causing it to flare up.

You also need to know that some medications may be causing your acne.

So what can you do to help clear your acne via a proper diet?

First you need to limit foods with high gylcemic index: soft drinks, white flower and refined sugars.

Then you should cut down on the dairy products: see if milk may be causing your acne to flare up. If you see a connection, eliminat the milk from your diet.

Eat vitamin A- and C-rich foods: brightly colored vegetables and citrus fruits are your best sources.

Eat foods rich in vitamin B6: like fish, beans, lentils, avocados

Go for zinc: you will find it in seafood and whole grains.

Omega-3 will help you balance your hormones and ward off the inflammation. You will find lost of it in salmon, walnuts, and flaxseed.

Also, a piece of ginger a day, willl do miracles to your skin.

So does chocolate really caue acne? It’s actually the dairy and sugar in it that cause the problem.

don’t forget to drink enough water to flush out the toxins and give your skin a beautiful healthy glow.

See a dermatolgist for best medications to treat your acne.

All the best!

Alyaa Gad

 

Eating During Cancer Treatment

Many patients with cancer, especially when undergowing chemotherapy or radiotherapy, suffer from loss of appetite, nausea, and other probelms in their digestive system.

Many of these problems can be helped with the following tips:

  • Plan your major meal when you experience the least nausea and vomiting. This is often the case early in the morning.
  • Eat small frequent meals throughout the day.
  • Let someone cook for you, because cooking odors might provoke your nausea.
  • If you’re suffeing from mouth sores or if you have difficulty swallowing, eat bland and pureed foods, like puddings, shakes, smoothies, mashed potatoes and rice, or soups.
  • Avoid salty, spicey, and acidic foods.
  • Take zink-rich foods, like nuts, beans, and mushrooms . Zink will help your sores heal faster.
  • If you have nausea, try chewing on ice chips or eating/drinking ginger.
  • If diarrhea is a problem, avoid fatty foods, raw fruits, and whole grain products. Instead, eat bland foods like rice and cooked apples.
  • Rest after eating in a sitting position.
  • Maintain your healthy dental hygiene: if brushing is too painful due to the mouth sores, try washing with a weak solution containing hydrogen peroxide.
  • Make meals visually attractive and in a nice setting.
  • Vitamin and supplement intake is to be avoided since there are concerns that vitamins might blunt the effect of chemotherapy against cancer cells and supplements might increase toxicity to the liver and kidneys. There are exceptions and some chemotherapy drugs specifically require a vitamin to reduce side effects. Ask your doctor for more information.
  • Regarding the fluid requirement on the chemothreapy days: Some chemotherapies require fluid to be taken before treatment to prevent kidney problems. Other chemotherapies require fluid to be taken afterwards to reduce bladder inflammation. Check with your doctor.

Wishing you a speedy recovery!

Alyaa Gad

Eating with Cystitis